Avoid Detergent Overload

Most people use far more detergent than they actually need to. Liquid, pods, powders – It’s no wonder there’s so much confusion about how to use laundry detergent correctly!  Knowing how much detergent to use can extend the life of your clothes and help conserve money by saving on the expense of detergent.

There are several factors to consider when it comes to using laundry detergent properly. First, determine what kind of detergent is best for you. Liquid detergents are easy to pour and work great for spot-cleaning grease stains and ground-in dirt. While powder detergents are good for consistent cleaning overall, too much powder can leave a milky residue on your clothes if not measured properly.  The popular pod takes the guesswork out of measuring out your detergent.  Be sure to never use regular detergent in high-efficiency (HE) washers. This will create far too many suds and can damage the washer’s mechanics over time.

Second, consider load size. Most detergent measuring caps or instructions should state the ideal amount of detergent to use for certain load sizes. Here’s a quick way to determine the load size: if the machine’s drum looks one-quarter full once all the clothes are inside, then that’s a small load. If it looks about half-full, it’s a medium load, and if it’s close to full, it’s a full load. Do not overload your washer—cramming in too many clothes won’t allow the detergent to distribute evenly, which can cause wrinkled, less-than-clean clothes.

Finally, be careful when measuring out your laundry detergent. Using too much detergent won’t make your clothes cleaner—in fact, it will leave a residue on your clothes that can make them break down that much faster and too many suds will not allow an adequate amount of water to fill the machine.  This is due to a water level sensor. Also, detergents today tend to be much more concentrated than they were in the past, so be sure to carefully check the recommended amounts on the detergent packaging and double-check the cap’s measuring lines before you pour. 

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Antique Linen Care

Some of us are fortunate enough to inherit a little piece of our family history. If we’re lucky, these items will be in good condition, but that’s not always the case. Some items may have dry rot, mouse nibbles and/or rust. You won’t be able to save these things if the fibers are already compromised. If you tug on two sides of a garment and it comes apart without much effort, your item has dry rot and has reached the end. But if you’re lucky enough to have a piece of family history here are some ways to take care of it.

To start, here are a few items you should have on hand:
White Vinegar
Rust Remover
Restoration – (Oxyclean is similar, more widely available and slightly less expensive than Restoration, but it doesn’t work as well.)
Bleach pen
Laundry detergent (simple soap, nothing added)

***PLEASE NOTE THAT I DO NOT GUARANTEE ANY METHOD THAT YOU CHOOSE TO TRY. IT ALL DEPENDS ON THE CONDITION OF THE GARMENT.***

“Restoration” and white vinegar are preferred products. Read the label and use common sense. You may only need to use “Restoration” for your initial laundering to remove storage dirt. You can also use “Restoration” in the washing machine with your laundry, too. It removes odors, age spots, storage stains, label stains and often, some rust. If it doesn’t remove the rust, try using “Whink Rust & Stain Remover.” Be aware that if rust has already eaten away the fibers that you may be left with a hole where the rust had been after cleaning with rust/stain remover.

Use “Restoration” first and, if stains remain after two or three sessions with it, put the dampened piece outside in bright sunshine for a day. This is often a magical solution. Horrible stains will usually disappear within an hour. This is the least invasive method. It is effective and it’s free – it also sanitizes. However, sunlight does bleach and weaken fibers over time. Sunlight is destructive so I am not suggesting that you constantly subject your fragile items to sunlight. This method, used once or twice on a piece that would otherwise need to be thrown away, can be very helpful. If the stains persist, you may need to resort to using bleach with laundry detergent. I like to have a bleach pen on hand because it allows me to pinpoint where I apply the bleach. After using bleach, always rinse with white vinegar, then rinse again with clear water.

Step 1. Use hot water with “Restoration” until the water turns clear. (approx. 4- 6 hours or overnight) If the water is not clear after overnight soak, repeat this step. Extremely filthy items may require several soakings.

Step 2. Drain and refill container with water; add white vinegar (a splash or a cup, depending on container size); swish around and soak for 10-20 minutes.

Step 3. Drain and refill with lots of clear water; swish around and soak for 15 minutes. Done!

If stains remain, repeat entire process.
If there is rust, use rust remover on wet fabric, then repeat from Step 2.

If stains remain, lay wet/damp item outdoors in sunshine.

If stains remain, soak with laundry detergent and small amount of bleach. Or use a bleach pen on small stains. It is better to soak longer using very little bleach.

IMPORTANT!
DO NOT mix chemical treatments. Pre-rinse items that may have bleach or detergent residue with vinegar to neutralize the bleach and then rinse twice in clear water before trying another treatment. DO NOT bleach anything after using Oxyclean or peroxide or any other chemical treatment. Your items may turn permanently blue, or worse Rinse really well before trying any other product.

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Whiter and Brighter Laundry

Baking Soda

What It Does: Baking soda helps deodorize and soften your clothes. Simply add 1/2 cup of baking soda along with your regular liquid laundry detergent at the start of the wash cycle. If you are using a powder detergent, add the baking soda during the rinse cycle.

Bleach

Use chlorine bleach only for whites and bleachable colors. Before using check for “non-chlorine bleach only” labels.

Non-chlorine bleaches, such as oxygen bleach (Oxi Clean) and hydrogen peroxide, are also great at whitening. These products are gentler than chlorine bleach, making them safe for most fabrics and dyes.

Hydrogen peroxide will whiten and brighten clothes, disinfect laundry, and remove stains. Pour it directly on stains such as blood. Add 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide to whites in the washing machine to brighten them

NOTE: Test in an inconspicuous area before using the product on darker colors.

White Distilled Vinegar

Vinegar is an excellent fabric softener and deodorizer. Pour 1/4 cup into your washing machine during the last rinse cycle. Continue the cycle as usual

Warning: Never combine vinegar with chlorine bleach as this will result in harmful fumes. Do not use vinegar on silk, acetate, or rayon clothing.

Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is a natural laundry whitener and freshener. Add 1 cup to your washing machine water along with your detergent. Only use lemon juice on white laundry.

Borax

Borax helps remove stains, and it deodorizes and brightens clothes. Borax also breaks down the minerals in the water so detergent can work better. Add 1/2 cup of borax at the beginning of the wash cycle.

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

  1.  What’s the secret to soft, fluffy towels? Vinegar and baking soda. Add these two ingredients to your load of towels plus half the recommended amount of detergent.
  2.   Running late? Hang your items in the bathroom while you shower to release wrinkles.
  3. You’ve accidentally shrunk your favorite sweater. No worries – soak it in a solution of baby shampoo and warm water, then gently massage it back to its original size. See our blog titled “OH NO! Shrunken Clothes!”
  4.  Vinegar and Baking Soda instead of detergent will revive your old towels.
  5.  Tennis balls in the dryer will decrease wrinkles in your bed linens.
  6.  Add salt to the wash to prevent colors from fading
  7.  Wash colors inside out to prevent fading over time.
  8.  Maintain the shape of your sweaters by laying them flat to dry as opposed to hanging them.
  9.  Squeeze a large lemon in with those workout clothes! It will break down oils trapped in fabrics & leave a clean fresh scent.
  10.  Adding 1/2 cup of white distilled vinegar to your rinse cycle is a natural fabric softener.
  11.  Swimsuit stretched out? Avoid the urge to wring out all of the water. Instead lay flat between towel and roll to remove excess water.
  12.  A little dish soap, a toothbrush, & some hot water do wonders for ring around the collar.
  13.  Trying to get a blood stain out? Use hydrogen peroxide and rinse well
  14.  Make DIY Dryer balls by rolling aluminum foil into a ball and placing in the dryer.
  15.  Wash dark clothes and jeans inside out and air dry them to keep from fading
  16.  Remove stubborn armpit stains with lemon juice and baking soda.
  17. Use hot water for white loads, warm water for the average load, and cold water for bright colors.
  18.  Wash your socks in lingerie bags to ensure they’ll never lose their match.
  19.  Use chalk to eliminate grease or oily stains.
  20.  Add Borax to every wash to keep your whites, bright and your colors, colorful.
  21.  Over drying clothes is the leading culprit of static cling. Always set your dryer to the recommended dry time.
  22.  Always dry towels and bulky items separate from your light weight items.
  23.  Not a fan of bleach? Brighten your whites instead by adding 1 cup of white vinegar oxygen booster lemon juice to the wash. Air-dry your clothes in the sun. You’ll have bright whites with a fresh, clean scent.
  24.  The best defense to any stain is to treat as soon as possible. Keep a Tide-To-Go Stain Remover in your purse or vehicle for those moments.
  25. To loosen a stuck zipper, rub a bar of soap over the teeth.

 

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Hat Sweat: How to Remove

Chances are, if you’ve got an athlete in your family, you’ve got a sweaty hat of some sort. You know the one….the hat that has the salty white residue around the edges. Help has arrived! Follow these simple steps and your hat will be back to looking good as new.

  • Apply a small amount of shampoo to the sweat stains and scrub the area with an old toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.
  • Moisten the area with cold water and apply a good amount of meat tenderizer. Work the tenderizer into the stain with your fingers or a toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.
  • Mix a paste with baking soda and water. Apply the paste to the stained area and add a small amount of white vinegar. Scrub the area with a toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.
  • Dissolve two aspirins in a half a cup of water. Apply the mixture to the stain liberally and allow it to set for at least two hours. Add a few drops of a gentle laundry detergent, such as Woolite and scrub with a toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.
  • Mix a solution of one part ammonia and one part water. Apply the mixture to the stain and scrub with a toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.
  • Mix a solution of one part white vinegar and two parts water. Apply the mixture to the stain and scrub with a toothbrush. Rinse and wash as directed.

 

  • NOTE: The bill of the cap often contains cardboard. Try not to get this part overly soaked as it may cause it to lose its shape. Quickly rinse to remove the cleaning products without fully soaking the bill.
  • If trying more than one removal method, be sure to thoroughly rinse the hat between each product to ensure they do not mix!! This could damage the hat and create toxic fumes.

 

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

How To Remove Ink Stains

 

How To Remove Ink Stains

Most of us have had an ink stain at some point or another, or a leaking pen ruin a favorite shirt or pants.  Before you toss those clothes in the rag bag, check out some of these simple at-home tips to deal with ink stain removal.

Hair Spray

Squirt the stain with hair spray and the pen marks should come right off.

Rubbing Alcohol

Try soaking the spot in rubbing alcohol for a few minutes to remove the ink, before putting the garment in the wash.

Vinegar

Treat an ink stain on a shirt by first wetting it with some white vinegar, then rub in a paste of 2 parts vinegar to 3 parts cornstarch. Let the paste thoroughly dry before washing the item.

Milk

Believe it or not, a Readers Digest article says to remove ink stains from colored clothes, an overnight milk bath will often do the trick. Just soak the soiled garment in milk overnight and launder as usual the next day.

Salt

Pour salt on an ink stain that’s still wet, gently dab with a wet paper towel, and then remove and brush off the salt. Repeat until the stain has completely lifted.

Sand Paper

Yes, you read that right.  The same Readers Digest article said to use a little fine-grit sandpaper and a gentle touch for removing or at least minimizing an ink stain or small scuff mark on suede clothing or shoes. Afterward, bring up the nap with a toothbrush or nailbrush. You might avoid an expensive trip to the dry cleaner.

Cream of Tartar

Make a paste by mixing 2 tablespoons of cream of tartar with 2 tablespoons of lemon juice. Cover the ink stain with the paste for 3 to 4 hours, then brush off the paste and wash the shirt.

Reminder: be sure that you have gotten all the ink out before you dry the washed garment in a dryer, because the heat of a dryer will set the stain.

 

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Natural Stain Remover’s

 

There are so many hidden chemicals in today’s products. Chemicals, unbeknownst to us, that can cause eczema, hives, contact dermatitis etc. If you’d like to switch to some natural products, here are a few to try:

White Vinegar

You can use white vinegar for so many things – cleaning, softener for your clothes and as a stain remover. Mixing white vinegar with dish detergent is a great remedy for removing greasy stains.

Boiling Water

Fruit stains, like berries, are particularly hard to get out of clothes. Household Management 101 claims if you pour boiling water directly on the stain it allows it to penetrate the fabric and effectively remove fruit stains.  They also recommend submerging the stain in a bowl of white vinegar for about an hour after you’ve poured the boiling water on the stain.  If parts of the stain remain, they say to use whitening toothpaste on the remaining stain and rinse well.

 Baking Soda

Baking soda is another product that most of us have in the pantry already. It’s an excellent natural stain remover  for many different types of stains.

Sprinkle some of on a wet stain and let it sit for about half an hour before washing. It’s really that simple.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide is a nontoxic chemical that can be used in so many ways and is affordable.

For sweat soaked, dirt stains – soak the stain in water mixed with hydrogen peroxide (50/50) for an hour and then add some hydrogen peroxide to the wash water.  Be sure to test the fabric before washing!

Denatured Alcohol

Denatured alcohol is also a great stain remover. Use a small amount with hot water to remove stains caused by grass or paint.

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Time To Recharge Your Towels

 

Every so often you grab a towel out of the linen closet and notice it’s lost its fresh smell and softness.  Let’s face it – no one wants to dry off with a scratchy, musty towel. Here are some steps that will help bring smell good, fluffy towels back.

1) Wash your towels with hot water and 1 cup of white vinegar only.

2) Re-wash a second time with 1/2 a cup of baking soda and hot water only.

3) Dry your towels on the hottest setting until completely dry.

If the odor and scratchiness continues, repeat the steps again only this time use 2 cups of vinegar.  If at all possible let the towels soak in the hot water and vinegar for an hour before continuing.

Vinegar  is known for  removing soap and fabric softener build-up. Fabric softener coats your towels with oils. Vinegar will remove the build-up, while acting as a fabric softener. Baking soda does the same thing as vinegar.

WARNING!

Do not mix vinegar and baking soda together.  Be sure to wash in two separate loads.  They will cause a chemical reaction when mixed together!

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

How to Wash Antique Linens

Some of us are fortunate enough to inherit a little piece of our family history. If we’re lucky, these items will be in good condition, but that’s not always the case. Some items may have dry rot, mouse nibbles and/or rust. You won’t be able to save these things if the fibers are already compromised. If you tug on two sides of a garment and it comes apart without much effort, your item has dry rot and has reached the end. Sometimes, you just have to let go, there’s no way to save it.

To start, here are a few items you should have on hand:
White Vinegar
Rust Remover
Restoration – (Oxyclean is similar, more widely available and slightly less expensive than Restoration, but it doesn’t work as well.)
Bleach pen
Laundry detergent (simple soap, nothing added)

***PLEASE NOTE THAT I DO NOT GUARANTEE ANY METHOD THAT YOU CHOOSE TO TRY. IT ALL DEPENDS ON THE CONDITION OF THE GARMENT.***

“Restoration” and white vinegar are preferred products. Read the label and use common sense. You may only need to use “Restoration” for your initial laundering to remove storage dirt. You can also use “Restoration” in the washing machine with your laundry, too. It removes odors, age spots, storage stains, label stains and often, some rust. If it doesn’t remove the rust, try using “Whink Rust & Stain Remover.” Be aware that if rust has already eaten away the fibers that you may be left with a hole where the rust had been after cleaning with rust/stain remover.

Use “Restoration” first and, if stains remain after two or three sessions with it, put the dampened piece outside in bright sunshine for a day. This is often a magical solution. Horrible stains will usually disappear within an hour. This is the least invasive method. It is effective and it’s free – it also sanitizes. However, sunlight does bleach and weaken fibers over time. Sunlight is destructive so I am not suggesting that you constantly subject your fragile items to sunlight. This method, used once or twice on a piece that would otherwise need to be thrown away, can be very helpful. If the stains persist, you may need to resort to using bleach with laundry detergent. I like to have a bleach pen on hand because it allows me to pinpoint where I apply the bleach. After using bleach, always rinse with white vinegar, then rinse again with clear water.

Step 1. Use hot water with “Restoration” until the water turns clear. (approx. 4- 6 hours or overnight) If the water is not clear after overnight soak, repeat this step. Extremely filthy items may require several soakings.

Step 2. Drain and refill container with water; add white vinegar (a splash or a cup, depending on container size); swish around and soak for 10-20 minutes.

Step 3. Drain and refill with lots of clear water; swish around and soak for 15 minutes. Done!

If stains remain, repeat entire process.
If there is rust, use rust remover on wet fabric, then repeat from Step 2.

If stains remain, lay wet/damp item outdoors in sunshine.

If stains remain, soak with laundry detergent and small amount of bleach. Or use a bleach pen on small stains. It is better to soak longer using very little bleach.

IMPORTANT!
DO NOT mix chemical treatments. Pre-rinse items that may have bleach or detergent residue with vinegar to neutralize the bleach and then rinse twice in clear water before trying another treatment. DO NOT bleach anything after using Oxyclean or peroxide or any other chemical treatment. Your items may turn permanently blue, or worse Rinse really well before trying any other product.

 

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer

Removing Muddy Water Stains and Mildew Odors

In light of the recent flooding in Oklahoma,  I’ve decided to post  with some helpful tips to help get rid of mildew odor and mud stains that have most likely affected many of you.

Mildew Odors

Washing your belongings a few times on a normal setting may get rid of the odor, but if that isn’t enough to combat the mildew smell, we’ve found a way to get your belongings back in shape and get that unpleasant smell out quickly. Here is how:

  1. Place your smelly belongings in the washing machine and fill with the hottest water possible. Add in 2 cups of white vinegar. Do not add any other products (detergent, softener etc.). This will allow the vinegar to penetrate the material without interference.  Run a full cycle.
  2. If the odor persist, repeat step 1, only this time use baking soda instead of vinegar. Run a full cycle once again.
  3. Dry until they are fully dry.

Muddy Water Stains

  1. Using the same method as above with vinegar works, but in case you don’t like the smell, you can always use a color-safe bleach and the warmest water your belongings will allow.
  2. Baking soda will also work.  Add approximately a 1/4 – 1/2 cup of baking soda to your load of laundry along with your favorite laundry detergent. Do not add any softener, this will allow the baking soda to penetrate the garments. Wash on the hottest setting your clothes/belongings will allow.
  3. If possible hang them out to dry to make sure all of the stains have been removed.  When hanging them out to dry isn’t an option, inspect them carefully before drying.  If needed, wash them again.
  4. Once all evidence of the stains are removed, dry them according to the label recommendations.

Read More 6 Ways to Cut Down Energy Costs In The Summer
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